:: Title :: Commentary on African-American influence in American folk music by Alan Lomax
:: Genre :: commentary, spoken
:: Performers & Instruments ::
Lomax, Alan [vocal]
:: Setting :: Unspecified
:: Location :: Texas City (Galveston County), Texas (United States)
:: Language :: English
:: Culture :: Southern U.S., African American
:: Session :: Alan Lomax as performer III
:: Date :: 4/19/1969
:: Reference Information :: T9000.0, Track 25 (00:03:10)
:: Original Format :: Reel to Reel
:: Session Notes ::
1 - A lecture and song performance given by Alan Lomax in Texas City, Texas, on April 19, 1969. Lomax illustrates the development of American folk music through New England hymns to black spirituals and bad man ballads. The recording was given to Lomax by Robert P. Shinn.
:: Recording Notes ::
0 - Africa is the most musical continent -- harmony and counterpoint originated there and it is the home of the most complex rhythmic patterns. In this hemisphere, African-Americans adopted the solo unaccompanied four-line European ballad form, producing songs like "John Henry," " Boll Weevil," "Casey Jones," "Down In The Valley," etc. Almost all the best known American songs came out of this creative adaptation of the European four-line strophic song.
:: Collection :: Miscellaneous Recordings 1950-1990

 

 

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